Italian Odyssey- Part 2

Jeepers have I been having some adventures here in Italy and now the UK.

I now really know how hard it is to eat travelling if you can’t afford to eat at a restaurant and can’t cook for yourself.

I have just visited my nephew in London and his girlfriend, Lili.   They live what is probably a typical London life in the sense they don’t cook.  They eat only organic foods but the organic foods they tend to mostly eat are organic snack foods. They aren’t vegetarian but I guess for them meat is not really an ethical substance to eat, so there is little meat eating going on.

This fast food chain in London is considered to have healthy food but all foods (except a salad) are bread based

As a result I noticed Lili needed to snack very frequently as her blood sugar levels started to drop.  Her breakfast of  porridge or muesli with oat milk sustained her for, at most, 2 hours then she needed another carbohydrate food fix.  Jonathan, my nephew commented that when they were on holiday away from home, Lili’s main priority was where her next two meals were coming from.

My nephew did, bless his cotton socks, try to do the diet last year, but he had friends who stayed who were ‘great cooks’ so he ate what they cooked.  Who wouldn’t at age 32 or even 52?  Except of course for someone who is rather health challenged and absolutely sick of being sick.

Everywhere I looked in London cafes there was only (except for a salad which only the hardy would choose on a cold summers day!) bread based snacks to eat.  What hope has the average Londoner out and about have?

On the flight to London I looked at the menu offerings interested to see if there was anything that wasn’t bread based and that wasn’t just junk food (like chips).  Not a thing.  Ian and I had bought some pistachios with us and our own water filter bottle so the airline didn’t get any more revenue from us.

When Lilli mentioned to me very quietly that she needed to snack a lot, I said it was because she wasn’t getting  much protein or fats from the foods she eats so she will become hungry often.  She also mentioned she had a chronic sore throat and I suggested to try eliminating some foods to see if  they might be the culprit, as in my experience it usually is.   She told me a friend did a weeks fast and that had fixed her so maybe that’s is all she needed to do.  Maybe it might work short term, but I doubt it very much.

I watched Jonathan opening and closing the fridge often to see if there is something in there to tempt him.  This is exactly what I used to do, looking in the fridge for something to satisfy a craving, but what is the craving?  I think it was probably for protein and fats.

I offered to cook Jonathan the same breakfast that Ian and I had every morning and I noticed after he had eaten this meal he did not snack or indeed didn’t  eat till dinnertime.

Back here in Italy,with my friend Heidi and her partner Mark, there is a continuous snacking also on carbohydrate foods.  Mark is a diabetic as is eating a high carbohydrate diet so of course he needs to frequently snack on these foods.  Diabetics (also now referred to a carbohydrate intolerance) are diabetics BECAUSE of the high carb food they eat, with the end result of insulin resistance, being from your bodies attempts to manage carbs.

Heidi looks at our lunch when we dine together, and says there is no way she would be full enough eating what we eat.

I understand the addiction so well and this is why it becomes so hard to even try to change people’s mind.  Only when the pain is enough, and for some this never eventuates, even with the verdict of cancer in fact.   Just like someone with lung cancer who continues to smoke we couldn’t dream of life without our our high carbohydrate foods.